Michael Lacey

Professor Michael Lacey has been with the Georgia Institute of Technology since 1996. Originally an Associate Professor without tenure, he has worked his way up to Full Professor in 2001 and Associate Chair for Faculty of the School of Mathematics.

He is known around the world in the field of mathematics for his accomplishments and for the accomplishments of the many students he has mentored throughout his illustrious career.

Many of the students that Michael Lacey has mentored personally accredit him for their accomplishments because of this guidance.

Throughout the years, he has mentored ten post-doctoral students as well as dozens of students from the levels of B.S. to Ph.D. Every Ph.D. student he mentored went on to achieve coveted careers in the field either in industry positions or academia.

Before teaching at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Michael Lacey had a long run at Indiana University in Bloomington from 1989 as an Assistant Professor at Georgia Tech. Read more: Michael Lacey |Math Alliance and Michael Lacey | Wikipedia

After graduating from the University of Texas and the University of Illinois in 1981 and 1987 with a B.S. and Ph.D. in mathematics, Michael Lacey was an assistant professor at Louisiana State University from 1987 to 1988 and the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill until 1989.

While at the University of North Carolina, he presented he and Walter Philipp’s proof of the central limit theorem. Walter Philipp advised Michael Lacey throughout his time at the University of Illinois including with his thesis over Banach spaces.

The recipient of many awards and fellowships, he received the ADVANCE Mentoring Award from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the National Science Foundation in 2012.

In 1997, he and fellow mathematician Christoph Thiele earned the Salem Prize, a much-coveted award due to many of the recipients going on to be Fields Medalists, for their research on the bilinear Hilbert transform.

Michael Lacey was esteemed from early in his career and was invited to Berlin, Germany the International Congress of Mathematicians in 1998. while there, he gave a 45-minute address to the Congress which consisted of a select group of his peers in the field.

Learn more about Michael Lacey:

http://people.math.gatech.edu/~lacey/ and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Lacey

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